"That coup bid was aimed at destroying Turkish democracy, destroying rule of law, and unseating a legitimate government," Simsek told CNN in an interview with Richard Quest.

"Those who perpetrated coup attempt should face justice. Now so far, I think any country would uphold these standards," Simsek said, referring to comments by allies on whether Turkey handles the post-coup attempt actions in line with the law.

"Our friends, our allies, first, we want them to be sincere in their condemnation of the coup attempt, and then see how we handle it," Simsek said.

The deputy prime minister responsible for Turkey’s economy said a group of rogue officers, seeking to overthrow the elected government, attacked civilians and the parliament.

"And people ignore this! Imagine, within US army, rogue elements attacking on White House, attacking Congress, attacking FBI. How would you respond?" Simsek asked.

The deadly coup attempt martyred more than 230 people and nearly 2,200 others were injured.

The government has repeatedly said the coup attempt was organized by U.S.-based preacher Fetullah Gulen and his Fetullah Terrorist Organization, known as FETO.

Gulen is also accused of a long-running campaign to overthrow the state through the infiltration of Turkish institutions, particularly the military, police, and judiciary, forming what is commonly known as the parallel state.

Turkey declared a state of emergency on July 20 after a group of rogue military officers were defeated in their coup attempt.

During a state of emergency, the Cabinet has the right to issue statutory decrees under the president of the republic without regard to routine procedures and restrictions in Article 91 of the Constitution.

These decrees were first published in the official gazette and then submitted to parliament for ratification.

Anadolu Agency