Speaking in Ankara, Suleyman Soylu said growing friction between Turkey and Europe came from Turkey’s objections to historic injustices stemming from European states’ involvement in the developing world, particularly in Africa.

According to the minister, Western nations used institutions such as credit rating agencies and International Monetary Fund (IMF) reports to designate world economies according to their own rules.

He blamed the West for claiming these were the best solutions to crises and to prevent wars.

"Turkey is no more their ally," he said, referring to Europe's efforts to stay superior economically and socially over developing countries.

"Turkey can have relations with every country in the world, become allies [...] but the ongoing process [tension with Europe] is not a disengagement but a restatement of relations and regulations," Soylu said.

He also accused some Western countries of staying silent about coups past and present in other states, and said they only raised their voices when they blamed some countries for failing in providing democracy or freedom of expression.

Over the latest tensions with Europe after the authorities in Germany, Austria and the Netherlands banned some campaign rallies by Turkish ministers ahead of an April 16 referendum on sweeping constitutional changes, Soylu said this was a domestic issue for Turkey.

"We don't change Germany's constitution. Neither do we change the constitution of the Netherlands. We don't hold a referendum for their sake," but Europe was very much concerned with Turkey's own referendum, he said.

According to Soylu, Europe needs a warning for not deporting PKK and Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETO) terrorists acting freely on their territories as well as staying silent during and after the failed 15 July 2016 coup attempt in Turkey, where at least 249 people were martyred and around 2,200 injured.

The putsch attempt was staged by FETO, according to the Turkish authorities.

Anadolu Agency