According to the head of the expedition, Vasil Nikolov, quoted by the Bulgarian National Radio (BNR), the new discovery suggests that mining activities in the area were much more significant than previously thought.

“This was a fluke, as many archaeological discoveries are,” Nikolov told BNR. “We found this wall, which in some parts is more than a metre high, but the rest was destroyed by an earthquake. I cannot yet say how tall it really was, but in its base it is more than three metres thick. But there are other walls in the area, which are almost four metres high. Just imagine – this is from the middle of the fifth millennium B.C.E. and there were no fortresses in Europe back then.”

During this year's archaeological season in Provadia, were discovered 10 funerals in the necropolis.

An archaeological expedition uncovered a church treasure of more than 1200 early Byzantine coins near the Dobrich village of Debrene, said the director of the Dobirch history museum Kostadin Kostadinov.

According to the head of the expedition Boyan Totev, this is the first such discovery in Bulgaria. He said the small amphora full of bronze Byzantine coins from the VI c. A.D. was most likely church mite, buried in the ground during an invasion of Slavs or Avars.

The discovery was made on the territory of a small fortress, most likely built in late antiquity around a basilica to protect it. The church itself was built during the late Roman empire and existed till the end of VI c. A.D.

Archaeologist have found late Roman, early Byzantine and old Bulgarian layers, as well as late Roman artifacts.

Source: Sofia News Agency / BGNES