Experimental archaeology carried out on 37,000-year-old ivory tool used in rope making

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Scientists from the University of Tübingen have discovered that a four-hole ivory tool made by modern man 37,000 years ago was used to make rope

Experimental archaeology carried out on 37,000-year-old ivory tool used in rope making

Nicholas Conard and Veerle Rots from the University of Tübingen, who studied a 37,000-year-old ivory tool found in 2015, discovered that it was used by modern humans to make ropes.

In their experimental work, published in the journal Science Advances, they created a replica of the stick and found that it could easily be used to make rope.

In 2015, in a cave in the Hohle Fels region of Germany, one of the many 37,000-year-old pieces of ivory, all showing signs of craftsmanship, was found to be about 21 cm long and studied.

In addition to the abrasion on the edges of the holes, there were hollows indicating that something had been repeatedly pulled through them, and the remains in the holes were thought to be plants.

Scientists experimented with various materials such as nettle, willow, linden, cattail, hemp, flax and deer sinew on the replica artifact created as part of experimental archaeology studies and determined that the tool was used for this purpose.

Source: Newsroom

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